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Another reason to keep working hard early on is because it’s the time when you’ll typically experience minimal obstacles. If you’ve done a good job of not broadcasting your plans then you’re still running in stealth mode. The beautiful thing about that is it delays the inevitable phase when everyone starts to weigh in with their opinion about what you’re doing. At some point, you’re likely to become the subject of talk around the water cooler at work, and the holiday dinner table in the family. We’ve already discussed why some people react negatively rather than supportively, and those reasons still hold true. You’re going to have to rely on that wisdom to get through the phase when people start talking. Remember that you’re just the subject of the day. The phase will pass and they will move on to other subjects. Remember for some its about the excitement of the gossip, rather than truly having any kind of investment in the topic itself. Most of them won’t possess any knowledge about the industry you’re working in anyway, so not only are their words unsupportive, they’re uninformed. Stick with what you know in your heart and what you’ve learned from others in your field about the work you’re doing. The longer you can operate under the radar, the more of your destiny you’re going to be able to build without unwanted scrutiny and unsolicited advice.

At some point you will have run through your initial resources and knowledge. Then it will be time to replenish the supply. Breakthroughs in progress can be made when we take the necessary steps to gain knowledge and build skills. Even if money and time are tight, chances are excellent that you’ll be able to find options for taking the next step forward. Online classes and seminars allow people with geographical or scheduling restrictions to learn anytime they want without ever leaving home. Many of these options are low cost, and some are free. Perhaps you’re an artist and you’re doing a great job of creating paintings. You’ve set a goal to have a showing in a gallery, and you’re half way through the number of pieces you wanted to produce before you began approaching local businesses with your work. You’re masterful at your craft, but you have no idea how to deal with the business aspects of your industry. Look for local or online classes in marketing, negotiations, entrepreneurship, or business management. Finishing college or attending graduate school may not be the level of education that’s required to succeed in your field. Tailor what you need to learn with the options, time, and money available to you. If there is absolutely no money or time for classes, go to the library and check out books or read magazines related to your industry to learn more about it.

Ask around to see who is a success in your field. You may run across a few folks who are territorial about their achievements, but you’ll run into far more who are generally happy to serve as mentors. Many of us enjoy sharing what we’ve learned and encouraging other people to make their dreams come true too. We also typically know several other key people who are well connected and willing to help out. Find one of these people and take them to lunch. It will be some of the best money you ever spend, and the most individualized of workshops you will ever attend. If you live in a remote area, then look online for credible people who have achieved the success you are working towards. In today’s ever evolving business climate, more and more people are establishing an online presence and are looking to connect with their fans and customers. A lot of these folks offer free e-mail newsletters that contain a wealth of knowledge that can prove to be exactly the education you are looking for. Regardless of which method you choose, finding training that advances your skills ensures you build progressive forward momentum.

Until next time, I’ll be praying for you to have fun exploring options for creatively learning what you need to take things to the next level.